International Baccalaureate – ‘It teaches you not to give up’ – Schools – Education – The Independent

It’s one thing to know what the International Baccalaureate (IB) might involve, but anyone enrolled on a programme or investigating the qualification for the first time may well be daunted by the prospect. The good news is that they won’t be alone in those fears, as many students share them. They may also turn out to be largely unfounded. “Before starting the IB I felt extremely intimidated,” admits Josh Hammond, a student at St Clare’s school, Oxford. “I had heard countless complaints about the difficulties of the IB. But, once you get going, you become more efficient at time management and the work seems less daunting.” There’s plenty to think about when it comes to the day-to-day reality of following an IB programme and, like Hammond, many students and teachers highlight the importance of good time-management from the outset. “Your IB experience can become quite gruelling if you don’t get on top of it,” says Alex Bird, head of the theory of knowledge and world religions faculty at UWC Atlantic College. “If you’ve got a deadline in six months, don’t wait until it’s upon you. Chip away at it.” Although students need to sharpen their organisational and study skills, they needn’t do it silently – or without support. “IB students are expected to be risk-takers and communicators,” says Sarah Jinks, a biology teacher at St Clare’s. “But the tasks we set are designed to help them develop those skills. You’re not expected to have them when you arrive.” Read more at International Baccalaureate – ‘It teaches you not to give up’ – Schools – Education – The Independent.

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